Film Review: The Return of Godzilla (1984)

Also known as: Gojira (original Japanese title), Godzilla 1984 (alternate title), Godzilla 1985 (US version), Godzilla: The Legend is Reborn (UK video title)
Release Date: December 15th, 1984 (Japan)
Directed by: Koji Hashimoto, R.J. Kizer (American scenes)
Written by: Shuichi Nagahara
Based on: The Resurrection of Godzilla by Tomoyuki Tanaka
Music by: Reijiro Koroku
Cast: Kenju Kobayashi, Ken Tankaka, Yasuko Sawaguchi, Shin Takuma, Yosuke Natsuki

Toho, New World Pictures, 103 Minutes

Review:

“A living nuclear weapon destined to walk the Earth forever. Indestructible. A victim of the modern nuclear age.” – Dr. Hayashida

In 1984, after Godzilla had been put to rest for nine years, Toho decided to resurrect the famous beast. Ignoring the lighter tone of the Shōwa era Godzilla sequels, this one directly follows the original 1954 film and cancels out the sequels before it. It was made in an effort to reboot the franchise and thus, launched the Heisei era of Godzilla movies.

In the same vein as the original Godzilla, this film has a heavily edited American version. And also like that film, the American version of this Godzilla featured actor Raymond Burr, reprising his role as Steve Martin from the original feature.

Like every kaiju film that has an American re-edit of its content, the Japanese version is far superior and that is the one I watch most of the time. I really only check back in on the American remake out of respect for Burr and his involvement in making Godzilla a household name in the United States. Without Burr, there is a strong possibility that I wouldn’t have met my favorite monster.

The American version featured a few narrative changes. Mainly, the edits made it more confusing. One of the notable changes however, is that it really paints the Soviets as enemies. Also, it was littered with Dr. Pepper logos in an obvious and over the top attempt at promoting the soft drink that featured Godzilla in some of its advertisements.

The film starts with a Japanese vessel being attacked by Godzilla, who was disturbed a few weeks earlier by a volcanic eruption. A large island near the boat appears to move and suddenly, it is revealed that it is no island but that it is in fact, the resurrected Godzilla.

The monster attacks and destroys a Soviet submarine and this brings in the Soviets and the Americans who insist on using a nuclear missile to destroy the giant beast. Japan refuses to allow nukes to be used on their soil again and we get to see a real world view of how Japan often times felt like a helpless and powerless country during the Cold War.

Godzilla starts to appear in Japan in an effort to feed off of nuclear energy. Japan then unveils its secret flying battle fortress the Super-X. Japan does a good job of getting the best of Godzilla and eventually, lures him into a volcano where he is assumed dead. Of course, he returned five years later to fight Biolante.

The Return of Godzilla is a return to Godzilla as a villain and a real threat to the world. Toho didn’t channel the lovable kaiju that became a protector of Japan. They went back to the series’ roots and turned out a solid film.

While The Return of Godzilla didn’t feature a big kaiju battle, it wasn’t necessary. The Super-X battle fortress made for a good opponent and helped keep this film on course with what the filmmakers intended. Another monster would have complicated the formula and it would have been difficult to paint Godzilla as a destroyer.

The tone of the film is perfect. It’s dark and it’s haunting. While Godzilla is dwarfed by some of the Tokyo skyscrapers, the scale works wonders. It has a magical and surreal feel to it and from a special effects standpoint, holds up in the same vein as a lot of the 80s action films from the United States. Sure, Godzilla is still a man in a rubber suit but Toho created a larger scale robot for more detailed shots. Besides, Godzilla doesn’t feel right when it isn’t a guy in a rubber suit.

The score by Reijiro Koroku is a departure from the more famous Akira Ifukube scores of the Shōwa era films but it is really good and it has a dark and intense vibe to it. I feel like the music from this film isn’t as beloved and appreciated as the Shōwa era themes but it is effective. The opening titles get you pretty pumped for this new version of Godzilla and it greatly accents the vibe of the new Heisei era.

The Return of Godzilla might not be every fan’s cup of tea but it was a step up in production value and effects. It opened the door that allowed Godzilla to continue to rampage for another decade before taking a second break for a few years.

The film failed to attract an audience in the States and was the last Japanese Godzilla film to be released in US theaters for quite some time. Regardless, once the Heisei era films became available to American audiences, the response was mostly positive.

2 thoughts on “Film Review: The Return of Godzilla (1984)

  1. I used to watch the American version over and over as a kid, the opening sequence on the boat legit spooked the hell out of me. I also remember being overwhelmingly sad during the finale, I was haunted by it for days afterwards. Anyways thanks for the trip down memory lane!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s