Film Review: Batman Returns (1992)

Release Date: June 16th, 1992 (Los Angeles premiere)
Directed by: Tim Burton
Written by: Daniel Waters, Sam Hamm
Based on: Batman by Bob Kane, Bill Finger
Music by: Danny Elfman
Cast: Michael Keaton, Danny DeVito, Michelle Pfeiffer, Christopher Walken, Michael Gough, Pat Hingle, Michael Murphy, Vincent Schiavelli, Andrew Bryniarski, Cristi Conaway, Paul Reubens

Warner Bros., 126 Minutes

Review:

“My dear penguins, we stand on a great threshold! It’s okay to be scared; many of you won’t be coming back. Thanks to Batman, the time has come to punish all God’s children! First, second, third and fourth born! Why be biased? Male and female! Hell, the sexes are equal with their erogenous zones blown sky high! Forward march! The liberation of Gotham has begun!” – The Penguin

When I was a kid, other than Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade and Back to the Future, Part II, this was my most anticipated sequel. This was also the second and final time that Michael Keaton would play Batman, as well as being Tim Burton’s last Batman picture.

While I don’t quite love this chapter in the film series as much as the original, it is still really damn good and certainly better than the two Joel Schumacher films that followed.

We lose Jack Nicholson, Kim Basinger, Robert Wuhl and Jack Palance but we gain Danny DeVito, Michelle Pfeiffer, Christopher Walken, as well as small parts by Vincent Schiavelli and Paul Reubens. Plus, Michael Gough and Pat Hingle return to accompany Keaton.

The two top billed villains in this story are the Penguin and Catwoman, although when you really analyze the picture, Walken’s Max Shrek is the true villain and his name was an obvious homage to Nosferatu actor Max Schreck. By story’s end, Catwoman is more of an antihero like she would become in the comics.

Danny DeVito was probably a perfect choice for the Penguin back in 1992. He had star power, charisma and definitely a similar body type. However, in this adaptation of the Batman mythos, he is reinvented to be more grotesque and much larger in girth. While he comes from wealth and opulence, this version of the character was rejected as an infant and went to live out his life in the Gotham City sewers where his only friends were sewer penguins and eventually the circus themed gang that he controls.

Catwoman also has a different origin. Here, she is a pushover secretary who gets in over her head and is shoved out of a high rise window, presumably to her death. There is a sort of mystical moment where alley cats swarm her body and she is magically reborn with cat-like reflexes and confidence. It’s pretty silly but Tim Burton made this film more like a dark fairy tale than his previous Batman movie.

Even though Gotham City is a massive place, the sets and design of this film make it feel pretty confined, even when we are in what are assumed to be wide open spaces. Maybe it was designed this way, intentionally. But the film feels smaller than the previous Batman movie, even though it cost a lot more to make: $80 million, as opposed to the $35 million budget of the first chapter.

Still, the cinematography is pretty good and the world looks much more like a Tim Burton world than the first film, which had tighter controls on it from the studio. It was the Burton elements though that I feel bogged this picture down a bit. Plus, the film was considered less family friendly and caused the studio to make drastic changes to the franchise after Burton was booted before the next picture. Granted, the followup movies were pretty horrendous.

This is a pretty good Batman picture, even if it does take some tremendous liberties in altering the source material. The right kind of spirit was there and this really just sort of exists in its own Tim Burton universe. That’s not a bad thing and if it wasn’t for the Burton Batman movies, we would have never gotten the near perfect masterpiece that was Batman: The Animated Series.

6 thoughts on “Film Review: Batman Returns (1992)

    • I love The Dark Knight but not so much as a Batman film but more as a crime thriller. Batman’ 89 is still my favorite overall, I’d say, as a Batman movie. I like The Dark Knight best regardless of it being a Batman story or not.

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      • A generational thing? I’m willing to bet that you are younger than me. I grew up watching Adam West’s Batman thus prefer less serious superheroes. I did like The Dark Night, but I didn’t love it the way love Tim Burton’s Neo-Expressionist opus.

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      • I was born in ’78 and watched Adam West’s Batman, which is one of my all-time favorite shows but I didn’t watch it regularly until after ’89’s Batman, which lead to the show being run in syndication again. Before that, I had seen a handful of episodes pop up on TV here and there over the years. I do remember that the first one I ever saw was “Joker Goes to School”.

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      • I was born in ’69 and TV’s Batman was fed to us ’70s kids like candy. Hulk, Green Hornet, Wonder Woman and the now forgotten Spider-man TV series were among my favorites. Buck Rogers and movies like Condorman and Flash Gordon were also very lightweight entertainment. Even James Bond (with Roger Moore) was designed to make us smile. Different times … 🙂

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      • Yeah, I like all that stuff though. Actually, rushed out and got the Buck Rogers DVD set when it came out a dozen years ago and paid like $120 for it. Then a few years ago I saw the same set in the discount bin for $5. I’ve also had bootleg DVDs of Green Hornet and Spider-Man for years. Loved those shows, man.

        Liked by 1 person

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