Film Review: The Beyond (1981)

Also known as: …E tu vivrai nel terrore! L’aldilà (original Italian), Seven Doors of Death (US cut version)
Release Date: April 22nd, 1981 (West Germany)
Directed by: Lucio Fulci
Written by: Dardano Sacchetti, Lucio Fulci, Giorgio Mariuzzo
Music by: Fabio Frizzi
Cast: Catriona MacColl, David Warbeck, Cinzia Monreale, Antoine Saint-John

Fulvia Film, 88 Minutes

Review:

“Woe be unto him who opens one of the seven gateways to Hell, because through that gateway, evil will invade the world.” – Emily [reading from the book Eibon]

Lucio Fulci is considered by many to be an Italian master of horror.  While I generally like his films, I would rank him behind both Bavas and Dario Argento. Still, that is really good company to keep.

I’m not a huge fan of this outing, however. The Beyond or Seven Doors of Death, has gained a nice cult following since it’s release nearly 40 years ago but compared to Fulci’s more famous Zombi, I think it’s pretty weak.

The story follows a woman who inherits a hotel in the bayous of Louisiana. The hotel sits on one of the seven gates of Hell. So obviously, some evil shit has to happen.

Being Italian horror, one would expect a colorful and vibrant color palate but Fulci didn’t really employ the giallo look like most of his Italian colleagues. This film is dark, gritty but kind of dull from a visual standpoint.

The story isn’t exciting or original and this type of movie has been done dozens of times over and much better. It’s not awful but it doesn’t offer up much outside of some gross out moments and quick scares.

Fulci, coming off of Zombi and it’s famous gory eye mutilation scene, tries to tap that well again multiple times here. There are a few gross out spots similar to that Zombi scene but none of them are as effective and if you are familiar with Fucli’s work, you kind of just think to yourself, “Oh, this again…”

Fulci also has a blind character that gets betrayed by a beloved seeing eye dog. This was a concept and idea that Dario Argento did in Suspiria, four years earlier.

In a lot of ways, this film feels like Lucio Fulci emulating things he likes from older films, as opposed to digging deep and giving us something better, which he was capable of. But it feels like this was just made to try and make a quick buck on the heels of his success with Zombi.

I love Italian horror and have been watching them since my teen years, when I first discovered the work of Dario Argento and Mario Bava. This just doesn’t measure up to the greats and it doesn’t even measure up to Fulci when he’s on his A-game.

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