Film Review: The Breaking Point (1950)

Release Date: September 30th, 1950
Directed by: Michael Curtiz
Written by: Ranald MacDougall
Based on: To Have and Have Not by Ernest Hemingway
Music by: Howard Jackson, Max Steiner
Cast: John Garfield, Patricia Neal, Phyllis Thaxter, Juano Hernandez

Warner Bros., 97 Minutes

Review:

“I ain’t got no choice. All I got left to peddle is guts. I’m not sure I got any. I have to find out.” – Harry Morgan

I haven’t seen John Garfield in a lot but I’m working my way through his noir-esque stuff. While this isn’t as good as The Postman Always Rings Twice, it is pretty close and an enjoyable experience, all its own. Plus, he looks pretty damn good in a captain’s hat.

This film was adapted from a Hemingway story, which made for a special kind of film-noir. This one had a nautical twist and much of the film took place on a boat bouncing around the coastline of California and Mexico.

The story sees a family man and boat captain get caught up in some criminal activity, as he’s trying to support his family and prevent losing his business due to the debt he has racked up on his boat. He has a black first mate and a femme fatale that tags along throughout the movie, although the femme fatale isn’t really all that dangerous and although Patricia Neal gives her some sass and a rough edge, she is mostly sweet. Really, she’s just there to create some sexual tension and to challenge Garfield’s wife, played by Phyllis Thaxter.

The contrast between Neal and Thaxter is really good and actually makes both characters look stronger, as both care about Garfield and the mess he’s dealing with.

The big finale, which sees Garfield take on some mobsters on his own boat is pretty exciting and while you don’t see any way that things will conclude smoothly, this is noir and to be true to the style, the shit has to hit the fan in a somewhat tragic way.

Garfield’s partner gets murdered by the mobsters and the final shot of the film is of a young black boy, standing on the dock, looking for his missing father. It’s a gloomy and sad ending, especially since Garfield’s partner was a nice guy just trying to help his friend and paid a price for Garfield’s secrets and criminal activity. All the white people run off with the injured Garfield, leaving behind this young black boy, as the camera fades out. It’s pretty heartbreaking.

One thing I like about the film is that a lot of it takes place in tropical bars with lots of bamboo and a Tiki aesthetic. It really transports you to the era and the location of where this was made and where it was set.

The Breaking Point isn’t noir at its best and it isn’t a strict noir. It does show how the style evolved in a different way and that a noir movie didn’t have to be set in the city or on a country road with a mad man.

Rating: 7.75/10
Pairs well with: The Postman Always Rings Twice and Key Largo.

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