Film Review: Fright Night (1985)

Release Date: August 2nd, 1985
Directed by: Tom Holland
Written by: Tom Holland
Music by: Brad Fiedel
Cast: Chris Sarandon, William Ragsdale, Amanda Bearse, Stephen Geoffreys, Roddy McDowall

Vistar Films, Columbia Pictures, 106 Minutes

Review:

“Hello, Edward. You don’t have to be afraid of me. I know what it’s like being different. Only they won’t pick on you anymore… or beat you up. I’ll see to that. All you have to do is take my hand. Go on, Edward. Take my hand!” – Jerry Dandridge

This was one of those movies I discovered at the video store, as a kid in the 80s. Once I found it, I rented it almost monthly for a year or two. That was, until the crappy sequel came out and sucked the wind out of this film’s sails. It could have been a stellar franchise but it wasn’t. However, this picture is still a classic and always will be, in my opinion. Frankly, they should have just left the movie alone and never made a sequel or that reboot.

Chris Sarandon makes a pretty good vampire. While he is technically the star of the picture, this really is a good small ensemble piece, though.

William Ragsdale really gets the most screen time. This was before he had that cool Fox sitcom Herman’s Head and this was his most famous role outside of that show. His girlfriend is played by Amanda Bearse, who would also go on to be in a major Fox sitcom shortly after, Married… with Children.

The cast was rounded out by veteran Roddy McDowall, who is superb in this, and Stephen Geoffreys, whose character “Evil Ed” gave birth to two of the most overused catchphrases in the 1980s: “You’re so cool, Brewster!” and “To what do I owe this dubious pleasure?”

The film is an 80s teen horror romp. It exists in a similar vein to movies like Night of the Creeps and The Monster Squad, albeit more violent and less child friendly than the latter.

The special effects are pretty good but this was when practical effects were at an all-time high and the effects maestros of the 80s were on a different level, especially in regards to their ingenuity and creativity. The wolf effects, at the end, as well as the final battle between the heroes and the vampire were great. There’s a reason why I love movies like this, the aforementioned and An American Werewolf In London. Even at their most absurd, they still have a sense of realism because what you see is there in the physical world on set.

Fright Night is one of the top horror films of the 80s that isn’t connected to a famous slasher. It sort of revitalized the fantasy horror genre at a time when Jason Voorhees was chopping through everything in sight.

Film Review: Laserblast (1978)

Release Date: March 1st, 1978
Directed by: Michael Rae
Written by: Frank Ray Perilli, Franne Schacht
Music by: Richard Band, Joel Goldsmith
Cast: Kim Milford, Cheryl Smith, Gianni Russo, Roddy McDowall, Keenan Wynn, Dennis Burkley, Eddie Deezen

Irwin Yablans Company, 80 Minutes

Review:

Laserblast has gone on to be a sort of cult film, mainly because it was featured on Mystery Science Theater 3000. I actually didn’t see the episode when it aired back in May of 1996, where it was the final episode of the show on Comedy Central. It moved to the Sci-Fi Channel the following season. It was also the last episode to feature Trace Beaulieu, who played mad scientist Dr. Clayton Forrester and provided the voice of Crow T. Robot.

I didn’t first see Laserblast until more recently, when revisiting MST3K, in an effort to see every single episode that was still available.

To put it mildly, the film is absolutely atrocious in every way. Yet, somehow, they convinced Roddy McDowell to be in it but he often times would sign on to a pile of shit in spite of his talent. Luckily, he rebounded, somewhat, a decade later with Fright Night (probably best to ignore its sequel, though).

Laserblast also features nerd extraordinaire Eddie Deezen. He pretty much played different variations of the same role throughout the 70s and 80s. He’s probably most known for Grease and its horrible sequel but he was also known for War GamesCritters 2, Steven Spielberg’s 1941Midnight Madness and being a prominent voice actor.

The film also stars a bunch of other people but when I have to point out Eddie Deezen, as a casting high point, it’s probably best to ignore the rest of the people in the picture.

Laserblast is dull, it is stupid and it is a waste of the celluloid it was filmed on. The special effects are some of the worst that I have seen come out of the late 1970s. The spaceship is crap, its animation and physics of movement resemble that of an unintelligent child playing with his toys. The aliens are presented in stop motion of the worst kind in what was an embarrassing homage to the great Ray Harryhausen. The props were even worse, especially the arm-mounted laser gun that looked more like an early prototype of a t-shirt launching air cannon than anything menacing or bad ass.

There really is nothing about the film that is worthwhile. Without MST3K commentary, this would be damn near impossible to sit through. It is uninteresting, ugly and clearly displays a complete lack of talent in the filmmakers.

In reference to this motion picture, Mary Jo Pehl of MST3K said, “The lead guy, Kim Somebody, is another sterling example of how filmmaking is not a meritocracy. The fact that this film was even made proves that ‘anybody can do it.’ You can find this either inspiring or depressing.”